Cough Syrup Addiction

Stories surrounding Little Wayne’s recent health scare speculate that the rapper’s current troubles are a result of abusing codeine cough syrup, often referred to as “sizzurp.” He has been open about his use of cough syrup, even rapping about it, and many believe that it is responsible for a number of dangerous seizures he has recently suffered. If these allegations are true, he is not the first rapper to struggle with an addiction to Cough Syrup. Pimp C, a member of the Underground Kingz who had actually been featured on Three 6 Mafia’s hit “Sippin on Some Sizzurp,” was found dead from respiratory depression as a result of overdosing on Codeine Cough Syrup in 2007 at the age of 33.

The type of cough syrup being referred to here is not the stuff that you can buy over the counter at a drug store (although that type is abused more so by younger people who will drink an entire bottle in order to experience hallucinogenic effects caused by Dextromethorphan, or DXM— this is also known as “Robotripping”). “Sizzurp” refers to prescription Codeine and Promethazine. Promethazine is an anti-nausea medication that also acts as a sleep aid. Codeine is classified as an opiate—like heroin—and is extremely habit forming. It is intended to be used as a cough suppressant, but in higher doses produces a euphoric effect. Codeine, like all opiates, is a central nervous system depressant. An overdose can slow down respiratory functioning to the point of respiratory arrest causing death.

Codeine cough syrup is not only mentally addictive but physically addictive as well. Withdrawal symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, cold sweats and muscle aches. Many people who attempt to quit using codeine on their own struggle immensely with the withdrawal symptoms

If you or someone you love is abusing opiates, including codeine, There is a Solution can help. We are a treatment placement service that works with various detoxes and drug and alcohol treatment centers. So many men and women struggle trying to get clean on their own. Getting the help you need can ease the process. Detox is especially helpful as it prevents painful withdrawal symptoms and allows individuals to gently taper off the drug. We can help you find both long and short term recovery programs depending on your treatment needs.

To learn more about how we can help, call There is a Solution today at 1-800-832-5250. Our staff is available 24/7 to answer your calls and help you take the first step towards a new life.

How Long Does it Take to Become Addicted to Opiates?

image of drugsThe scary truth is that it is easier to become addicted to opiates than one may think. The length of time it takes to become physically dependent on opiates varies depending on a number of different factors. How much and how often you use opiates, the type of opiate you are using, age, gender, size, metabolism and your opioid receptors all play a role in the length of time it takes to develop a physical dependency on opiates.

However, as far as the time it takes to develop a psychological or mental addiction, some users report knowing that they were hooked from the first time they tried opiates.

For many individuals, becoming preoccupied with the length of time it takes to become addicted to opiates or wondering how long they can continue to use them is itself a red flag. It is important to recognize both the physical and mental signs of opiate addiction. Developing a physical dependency on opiates is made apparent when one abruptly attempts to stop using and experiences certain withdrawal symptoms, including:

  • Cold sweats
  • Muscle aches
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Yawning
  • Runny nose
  • Nausea
  • Goosebumps
  • Anxiety
  • Stomach cramping
  • Dilated pupils
  • Insomnia

However, you can be addicted to opiates without actually being physically dependent on them. Signs of psychological addiction include:

  • Continuing use despite physical, mental, legal or financial consequences
  • Preoccupation or mental obsession with using and getting more opiates
  • Using prescription opiates (Oxycontin, oxycodone, Percocet, Vicodin) that have not been prescribed to you or taking more than the recommended dosage
  • Developing a tolerance (requiring more of the drug to produce the same effect)
  • Taking prescription opiates for the “high” rather than the intended medical effect
  • Lying about your use
  • Feeling guilty about your use
  • Inability to control when or how much you use
  • Using despite a desire not to do so

If you are concerned that you may be addicted to opiates, it is important to reach out to someone who can help. There is a Solution is a drug treatment placement service. We work with a large network of drug treatment facilities that provide varying levels of care, including detox, inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, sober living and drug counseling.

If you are concerned that you or someone you love may have a problem with drugs, contact one of our addictions professional today by calling 1-800-832-5250. We are available 24/7 to take your calls and answer your questions.

Breaking the Chains: Treatment for Opiate Addiction

For some addicts, their addiction to opiates was a gradual process.  They may have been prescribed painkillers for an injury, but overtime their use started to spiral out of control. For others, the moment they tried opiates they knew they were in trouble.

 

 

 

What are opiates?

Opiates, a class of drugs also known as narcotics, act as painkillers. In higher doses, the user will experience a sense of extreme calm and euphoria. In a high enough dose, the user can experience respiratory failure and death. Opiates include both illicit street drugs like heroin and prescription drugs such as Oxycontin, Vicodin, Percocet, Oxycodone and Methadone.

What does treatment for opiate addiction include?

Opiate addicts will develop both a mental obsession with the drug as well as a physical dependency on it. If they attempt to quit using on their own, they will begin to experience withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms generally include flu-like symptoms, such as nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, cold sweats, chills and muscle aches. Treatment for opiate addiction starts with a medically supervised detox. This is to ensure that you are safe and as comfortable as possible during the detox process. Doctors who specialize in addiction treatment will prescribe Suboxone or Subutex, detox medications that help to alleviate the discomfort associates with withdrawal. The detox process usually takes seven days to complete.

However, breaking the physical dependency to opiates is only the first step in treating opiate addiction. Addressing the underlying issues that are often associated with addiction and addictive behaviors is vital to the treatment process. Getting sober is one thing—learning to use the tools that are offered to you in treatment is what will help you maintain your sobriety and begin enjoying the gifts of a life not controlled by drugs and alcohol.

There is hope. There is a Solution is a free treatment referral service that works with men and women who are struggling to overcome an addiction to opiates. We are addictions professionals that can help you determine your treatment plan. Our goal is to make sure that the path you take in your journey towards recovery is the best one for you and your specific needs. We can provide you with accurate and detailed information about various treatment options and work with you to determine which facility would be right for you. We work with treatment centers that specialize in the treatment of opiate addictions that can offer you the medical and therapeutic support you need.

To learn more about our services at There is a Solution, call us today at 1-800-832-5250.

How Long Does Oxycontin Stay in Your System?

Oxycontin is a prescription painkiller that is grouped in a class of drugs known as opiates. It is used to treat high levels of chronic pain. In addition to alleviating pain, it can create feelings of extreme relaxation and euphoria. In a high enough dose, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

How Long Does Oxycontin Stay in your System?

How long Oxycontin stays in your system depends on the type of testing method. It can stay in your urine 3- 4 days and in your saliva 1-4 days. Drug tests rely on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry  to determine if Oxycontin is in your system. Hair test can test positive for up to 90 days.

However, if you are concerned how long Oxycontin will stay in your system, it could be a sign that you have a problem. If you are using Oxycontin without a prescription or using more than you are prescribed you may want to consider getting help. Trying to determine how long Oxycontin will stay in your system in order to pass a drug test is part of the insanity of addiction. Whether you are trying to pass a drug test for legal, employment or family-related reasons, consider what you stand to lose if you test positive for Oxycontin.  If it is important that you pass a drug test, but find that you cannot stop using or attempt to continuing using as long as possible prior to taking the test, you may want to seek treatment.

The statistics are truly terrifying. According to the Center for Disease Control, 100 people die each day as a result of overdosing. In 2008 there were almost 15,000 deaths as a result of prescription painkillers, such as Oxycontin. That’s an entire college campus. It’s the size of a small town. In 2010, 2 million people reported that at some point in the past year they used prescription painkillers not under the supervision of a doctor for the first time. With such an alarming number of new users, we can only expect to see an increase in the number of overdoses.

There is a Solution is a free service that helps men, women and teens break out of the viscous cycle of addiction and enjoy a life free from the bonds of drugs and alcohol by finding them the help they need. If you are tired of the chaos and pain of addiction and if you want to be able to enjoy life clean and sober, reaching out for help is the first step. Don’t lose another day to addiction—call There is a Solution today at 1-800-832-5250.